How To Survive Falling Through the Ice In The Arctic

      Okay… you don’t want to be walking on thin ice, but it happens to Inuit hunters in their lifetime. One man in his seventies said he was saved because he wore cariboo skin. Each item of clothing has a name, but really all one wears is a hoodie, pants and boots of skin. Synthetic materials won’t do for this scenario.

      So, I don’t know how he got out of the water. You would have to do that quickly. West of the Inuit territory of Nunavut, in the Yukon territory, a friend of mine said he pulled over and simply dipped his head into the water for whatever silly reason, and lightning shocks pounded his head because it was SO COLD. He jerked his head right back out of the water.

      I suppose the cold still water would cause you to electrocute yourself biofunctionally and quite literally to force you to take creative action to get out. Assuming you DO get out and don’t die in the water, you will be laying on the stable ice in clothing maybe 30 miles from home and anyone else. You would be lying down a bit exhausted in clothing drenched in freezing water.

      No one could help you because who carries spare clothes when they hunt so often. You would have to take off all your clothes, turn them inside out and wait, completely exposed, but its cold air- not cold water. Then, when the water that soaked the inside of the suit FREEZES, you crack in with your hands, turn the suit right-side-in and put it on. Are you taking notes, SEAL Team Six? Because if you were at war in the arctic, you would have to do that, redress and warm up.

      Up there in the territories, it is not a war though. Its more like an eternity of a no man’s land. Doubtful anyone reading this is planning a trip. But if you do go out there, the Inuit elder hunter says its a good idea to know how to sew too. Which is another way of saying “take a needle to where the needle takes ya!”

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